ALLOTMENTS

Sanitiser

There is now a bottle of hand-sanitiser at the Allotment gate. It is on the left-hand pillar. None of us know how long Covid19 will go on for and it may be necessary to fit a more permanent fixture, but, crude as the set-up is, it should do the job for now.

It only needs to be used if you happen to be the person who opens or closes the gate. It is out of sight of passers-by so we are not anticipating its theft or misuse.


Allotment Committee


Sanitiser
Sanitiser

Spring on the Allotments

The allotments were looking good in the Spring sunshine today.

Amanda

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What the NAS is doing to help members

The National Allotment Society is working to provide clarity for our members on what the virus outbreak and ensuing impacts will mean for Allotment Holders.

As more information become available, we will be updating our advice to our members, please read the Q & As below (as of 8 April 2020) on how the outbreak is affecting Allotment Sites and their use.


NAS Q & A On Allotments and Social Distancing


Protect yourself and your family.

We are all living through a crisis, the likes of which the country has not experienced since war time. The community spirit that exists on allotment sites is now vitally important.

Please remember to look out for one another during these very difficult times and take all the steps you can to reduce the risk of contagion from the Covid- 19 virus when you visit the plot.

Covid -19 - The virus that causes Covid 19 is mainly transmitted through droplets generated when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks. The droplets are too heavy to hang in the air and they quickly fall and contaminate floors and surfaces.

Smaller airborne particles can remain in the air for some time. You can be infected by breathing in the virus if you are within close proximity of a person who has Convid-19- hence the 2m social distancing requirement, or by touching a contaminated surface and then touching your eyes, nose or mouth before washing your hands.


Can I still work my allotment during the Covid19 lockdown?


Yes, allotments are a great way of both getting exercise and obtaining food during this crisis.


Can I visit the allotment with my family?


Yes, government guidelines state that you can exercise with members of your household


Why then is the NAS suggesting that we consider going alone to the plot?


This is just a suggestion and plot-holders can decide for themselves but we are looking at the bigger picture and concerned about the risk of sites being shut – as they have been in Ireland and France. If some plot-holders are happy to visit alone or stay away for a few weeks that reduces this risk.


How long can I stay at the plot?


Government Ministers have suggested that an hour’s walk is reasonable and asked us all to limit time spent outside the home. The Society believes that if you are using your plot for daily exercise it would be reasonable to spend an hour or two doing the jobs that need doing for that day and then to return home.


How can I ensure my family’s and everyone else’s safety at the plot?


Do not attend the plot if you have coronavirus symptoms or a family member is self-isolating
Take a flask of hot water, soap and paper towels to the plot with you (cold water will work too). Use hand sanitiser (should be 60% alcohol content) before entering the site and opening any gate locks.
Wash hands for at least 20 seconds after closing the lock, dry with a paper towel The most effective part of hand washing is the drying using preferably paper towel to remove the layer of dead skin scales - on which virus and bacteria sit. Paper towel to compost heap.
DO NOT touch your face after using anything that has been touched by other people- use an elbow to work the push taps.
Wash your hands again for 20 seconds, dry with a paper towel before opening and closing the lock to leave the site.
Use hand sanitiser after closing the lock.
Wash hands when you get home.
DO NOT gather together for a chat even if you are 2 metres apart.
Observe “Social Distancing” with each other 2-3 metres.
If you take your children to the plot, ensure that they stay within its confines and do not run around on communal paths and spaces.
Do not share tools.
Do not wash your hands in water troughs


Can I drive to my allotment?


We do not have an overall answer to this question. Police forces are clamping down on non-essential travel, some have said that a short drive to the plot is permitted if there is no other choice, others are still enforcing the prohibition on driving to exercise. Check with your local force. Walk to the plot if at all possible and do not take public transport.


Stay safe.

The National Allotment Society

Allotments Do Count as "Exercise"

Michael Gove MP, UK Minister for the Cabinet Office, stated this morning on television that going to and tending your allotment was considered exercise and therefore allowable under the current more stringent rules for slowing the spread of the coronavirus.


Tony Jarrow

Coronavirus: Emergency Allotment Rules

This evening, the Prime Minister imposed stricter rules on the population of the UK to limit the movement of people, and hence the spread of the virus. My aim here, is to interpret these new curbs in relation to members of our Allotment Association.

I am not going to state all the rules that already exist, or repeat all the advice that has been issued in recent days – I am only going to interpret, to the best of my ability, those specific to allotment members.

The Prime Minister said that people will be allowed to leave their home just once a day for exercise – such as a walk, run or cycle ride - and they should be alone or with members of their household.
My understanding, is that this means you will be allowed to go to the allotment to work on your plot as long as you obey the following rules:

  • Any plot-holder who is self-isolating because a household member is ill with corona-virus (even if just suspected) should NOT be visiting the site at all.
  • Use your own hand sanitiser before opening and closing the lock and gates.
  • Observe 'Social Distancing' – stay at least 3 metres away from others.
  • Do not share tools.
  • No un-authorised people are allowed onto the plots.
  • Do not use the site toilet.

Our site is large and spacious so it should not be difficult to follow these restrictions. It offers an excellent safe way to get fresh air and exercise during these difficult times.

It also enables you to enjoy the spring sunshine and 'normal life' - while escaping the stress of TV News and Social Media.

The ground is drying out nicely and almost perfect for easy digging and weeding. It is the start of a new growing season: make the most of it.

Take care


Tony Jarrow


Allotment morning
Allotment morning

Night-time Allotment Thief

Several plot-holders have complained about crops being nibbled, broken and dug up but we had no idea what was causing the problem – until now.

I set up a wild-life camera to take pictures repeatedly throughout last night. Of the hundreds of photos taken (every minute), here are the interesting ones.

It is a hare! Some us had suspected a deer was invading the site at night but here is evidence that a hare (hares?) is the culprit.

Of course, there maybe deer too: we will have to wait and see.


Night photo
Night photo
Night photo

This last photo is interesting: it was taken the night before.


Night photo

No animal on the ground but what is that white streak in the sky?

It is well illuminated by the camera's infrared light and I initially thought it might be a passing owl; five wing flaps in the picture. However, I then discovered that the exposure time of the photo was just 1/13th second. That would mean the owl flapping 65 times per second (5x13=65): impossible!

Maybe a moth very close to the camera – but that is a very straight line and do they flap that fast? Anyone got any ideas? It is the only picture to show this image.


Tony Jarrow


NOTE

Members should not consider causing any harm to hares, no matter how much of a nuisance they may be.

One of the aims of the Cropwell Bishop Allotment Association is, "to encourage members to value wildlife in their allotments" and, in tending our crops, "to cause the least harm to wildlife".

Hares, like birds, mice and deer have every right to be on the Allotment Site and it is up to members to use safe ways to protect crops – such as fencing and netting. Members must not deliberately harm wildlife.
(pages 4-6 of Allotment Handbook)

Lock the Gate

Lock gate

If we want intruders to drive onto the Allotment site, walk over our plants, break into our sheds and steal our tools, then all we have to do is leave the gate open when none of us are there.

But we don't want that – so please remember to lock the gate when you leave the allomtment, unless you can actually see someone else on site.

There is now a sign to remind you.

Thanks


Tony

Lock gate

Spring on the Allotments

During the winter, when days are short, cold and usually wet, life slows down and little action takes place on the site on Fern Hill.

Then, in April, everything changes. Days are longer and warmer and all life wakes up and plants start to grow. Plot holders have a spring in their step and, once the clocks go forward an hour, there is suddenly time at the end of a working day to do a bit of digging or planting before the sun sets.

As you can see from these photos, the allotment site is springing to life.


Tony Jarrow


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Fly-Tipping

As many of you will be aware, we recently had two cases of fly-tipping outside the gates of the allotments.

First, several bags of rubbish were left then, a few days later, 9 big upright freezers were tipped there. These blocked the entrance to the site and the bridle-path. I was not even aware of the problem until a plot-holder alerted me.

Thankfully, Rushcliffe Borough Council are very efficient at dealing with fly-tipping and once I alerted them the items were removed within days.

The problem of fly-tipping is not likely to go away and it could easily happen again at any time. I think we need to deal with problems promptly in case the rubbish attracts other fly-tippers.

There will be times when I am not available (eg. on holiday) so, if you do see occurances of fly-tipping (anywhere in Cropwell Bishop or Rushcliffe for that matter) you can easily notify Rushcliffe Council directly.

The easiest way of doing this is to click on the "Contacts" tab (on the right of this web page).

On the Contacts page you will see a link, "Report Fly-Tipping" near the bottom. Just click it and follow the few simple steps to report the problem. There is even a map so that you can pin-point the location: it is very easy.

It won't matter if several people end up reporting the same problem.

Thanks

Tony Jarrow

Autumn Jobs

Members of Cropwell Bishop Allotments Association were busy on their plots this weekend. Let's hope Hurricane Ophelia does nothing to spoil their good work. Thanks to Amanda Parkinson for the photos.

October

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Spring Sunshine

Members of Cropwell Bishop Allotments Association were out in force at the weekend, attracted by the beautiful spring weather. Thanks to Amanda Parkinson for the photos.

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Spring

The Good Life

Have you ever have thought about the benefits of having an allotment of your own and all its benefits: freshly-picked food; tomatoes grown for their taste not long shelf-life; loads of strawberries to eat fresh, make jam or frozen so that you can have them on ice cream in the autumn; potatoes all year round; beetroot that you can pick in the morning, cook in the microwave and have in sandwiches at lunchtime; and much more.

Or maybe you have thought more about the health benefits: effectively having your own 'gym' within walking distance of home. Exercise for the whole family without any monthly fees.

Now is the best time of year to begin making those New-Year resolutions a reality: healthy eating and more exercise.

Contact me to find out what is available on the Cropwell Bishop Allotment site up on Fern Road. Currently, we have vacant full-size plots, half-size plots and even an offer of a share in an established half-plot. Some even have a shed.

Choose now before the growing begins.

Tony Jarrow

Allotment Life

Allot site June 2015

Five years ago our Allotment Site was just a field of grass. Look how the plot holders have changed it into an oasis for growing vegetables, fruit, flowers and animals. Also a place for enjoying the outdoors and being 'away from it all'.

Tony Jarrow

Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015 Allot site June 2015

If you are interested in having an allotment, contact me, Tony Jarrow.

Reap all the benefits of your own allotment plot

The days are getting longer, brighter and warmer: that means plants will be eager to grow again. Those of us who have a plot on the Cropwell Bishop Allotment site know that the effort you put into growing our own vegetables and fruit will result in food that you know is fresh and free of harmful chemicals.

The days are getting longer, brighter and warmer: that means plants will be eager to grow again. Those of us who have a plot on the Cropwell Bishop Allotment site know that the effort you put into growing our own vegetables and fruit will result in food that you know is fresh and free of harmful chemicals.

Then there is the satisfaction of seeing the high price of fresh food in the supermarkets, knowing that you have got even better produce on your plot for free. You soon realise that the annual cost of having an allotment is soon covered by the savings you make when shopping.

Then there is the joy of opening the freezer in the winter months and picking out carrots, beetroots, raspberries and whatever else you froze in the summer.

Of course, you do have to do some physical exercise in digging and weeding and, later on, picking your strawberries, beans, rhubarb, apples, etc, but you just look upon that as another saving: instead of paying to go to the gym you get your exercise for free!

There was a time when allotments were the place to see retired men plodding around. Not any more: you are just as likely to see a young mum with her children. All kinds of people are making use of allotments to, not only grow food, but also escape from the sound of television and all the other pressures of modern life. Think of them as a place to grow crops and also for you to grow calmer.

This is the time of year when plot holders renew their subscription and, as always, there are a few who, because of a change in personal circumstances, choose not to continue. As a result we have several vacant plots that are available for rent.

Because everyone's needs and available time are different we are happy for people to have the kind of plot that best suits them. Some people want the space available on a full-size plot (25m x 10m) while others prefer a half-size plot. It may be that you would like to share a plot with friends, for example having splitting a full-size plot into three (a third plot each), possibly sharing a single shed. We want you to enjoy the pleasure of an allotment plot without you overstretching yourself.

Five years ago our Allotment Site was just a field of grass. Look how the plot holders have changed it into an oasis for growing vegetables, fruit, flowers and animals. Also a place for enjoying the outdoors and being 'away from it all'.

We currently have a range of different vacant plots; full-size (£60pa), half-size (£32pa), plots with fencing, plots with sheds, plots that have been cultivated and plots that are grassy, plots with fruit trees ..... something to suit everyone. These surrounding pictures give you an idea of what there is but the best way of assessing your options is a guided tour. To arrange this, phone me (0115-989 3178).

Tony Jarrow